Tag: treatment outcome

Snoring Is Not Relieved by Nasal Surgery Despite Improvement in Nasal Resistance: Conclusions

It is, of course, possible that our negative findings are only due to the methodology. Discordance between perceived and recorded snoring has been reported. The results may differ depending on the population studied. Whether a single-night recording of snoring is adequate remains unknown as the repeatability of these measurements is also unknown. Furthermore, how much…

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Snoring Is Not Relieved by Nasal Surgery Despite Improvement in Nasal Resistance: Recommendation

Variable treatment outcomes can be hypothesized to reflect differences in other obstructive sites. Strifes and coworkers reported better outcomes after nasal surgery in patients with normal cephalometry in 14 patients who were matched for SDB and BMI. In six of seven patients with a wide ph1-ph2 and a short H/MP as criteria for normal cephalometry…

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Snoring Is Not Relieved by Nasal Surgery Despite Improvement in Nasal Resistance: Symptoms

Hoffstein and coworkers did not find differences in the mean or highest sound intensity across the sleep stages in heavy snorers. However, Nakano and coworkers reported increased snoring time and intensity during slow-wave sleep, when compared to REM sleep in apneic snorers. In the present study, the snoring intensity index was also found to be…

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Snoring Is Not Relieved by Nasal Surgery Despite Improvement in Nasal Resistance: Treatment

Objective snoring measurement has been performed earlier in one surgical study and in some studies using nasal dilators, nasal decongestants or topical corticosteroids.’’ Some studies have reported the degree of nasal obstruction before and after treatment by objective nasal measurement. Patient samples in nonsurgical studies have varied from subjects without nasal symptoms or signs of…

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Snoring Is Not Relieved by Nasal Surgery Despite Improvement in Nasal Resistance: Discussion

Table 2 shows preoperative and postoperative PSG data in the overall patient group, and in the subgroups with surgical improvement and no improvement of nasal patency. There were no statistical differences in preoperative breathing or sleep parameters between the subgroups (Table 2). REM sleep increased after the operation in the overall patient group and in…

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Snoring Is Not Relieved by Nasal Surgery Despite Improvement in Nasal Resistance: Results

Differences between the subgroups were evaluated using the Mann-Whitney U test. Comparisons of snoring intensity between REM sleep and NREM sleep, between supine and nonsupine sleep position, and between preoperative and postoperative measurements were analyzed using the Wilcoxon matched-pair test. A Pearson correlation analysis was used to evaluate the relationship between the change in REM…

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Snoring Is Not Relieved by Nasal Surgery Despite Improvement in Nasal Resistance: PSG

Snoring was detected as previously described with a microphone attached to the subject’s throat, and the analog signal was transferred to the monitor screen. Another microphone was attached to the ceiling, 2 m from the patient’s head, to record sounds on a videotape. During the calibration process, the subjects were asked to imitate snoring as…

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Snoring Is Not Relieved by Nasal Surgery Despite Improvement in Nasal Resistance: Cephalometry

Cephalometric analysis was carried out before nasal surgery with patients in upright and supine body positions, as has been described. The group of patients with normal cephalometry findings consisted of patients with a posterior airway space (ie, the minimal distance between the base of the tongue and the posterior pharyngeal wall [ph1-ph2]) of > 7.0…

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Snoring Is Not Relieved by Nasal Surgery Despite Improvement in Nasal Resistance: Patients and Study Design

The study population consisted of 40 consecutive men who had been referred to the ENT Hospital at Helsinki University Central Hospital because of a snoring problem or suspicion of sleep apnea and were scheduled for surgical treatment of nasal ob-struction. Only one patient had undergone septoplasty earlier, but other upper airway surgery for SDB had…

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Snoring Is Not Relieved by Nasal Surgery Despite Improvement in Nasal Resistance

A relationship between nasal obstruction and snoring or sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) has been found in several previous studies, suggesting that SDB can be worsened by nasal obstruction and can even result from it. Nasal resistance has been found to be higher in snorers when compared with nonsnorers, and in SDB when compared with primary snoring….

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