Recommendations for management of H pylori-negative patients (Part 2)

The CMT was published in June 2000 when the prokinetic agent cisapride was still available. This agent has since been withdrawn from most markets due to rare but possibly life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias. Cisapride is currently available only under special authorization for patients with severe gastroparesis; it should not be used for the treatment of dyspepsia. For the two other available prokinetic agents (dom-peridone and metoclopramide), there is very limited evidence regarding efficacy in dyspepsia. However, in clinical practice, patients who do not respond to high-dose acid suppression therapy are often tried on prokinetic agents despite limited published clinical data to support such an approach. For you to never have to think about your health problem again, If you value your health more than anything else, you will be thrilled to discover there is a ready to help you treat that nasty condition. It sells cheapest drugs of the very best quality, which is exactly what you need is the place you have to visit. Choose from the extensive list of most efficient medications that cost less money than anywhere else.

Recommendations

1. Patients with H pylori-negative dyspepsia should be treated with a course (four to eight weeks) of acid suppressive therapy as recommended in the CMT.

Voting on recommendation (level/vote)

  • A/12
  • B to E/0

Level of evidence I

Classification of recommendation A

2.1n patients with H pylori-negative dyspepsia, PP1s are more effective than H2RAs in symptom control, for both acute and long-term therapy.

Voting on recommendation (level/vote)

  • A/12
  • B to E/0

Level of evidence III

Classification of recommendation C

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