Category Archives: Respiratory Failure : Part 2

Urine Hydrogen Peroxide During Adult Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Patients With and Without Sepsis – Conclusion

Urine Hydrogen Peroxide During Adult Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Patients With and Without Sepsis - ConclusionThe additional source of H0O2 in patients with sepsis is undoubtedly related to the extra noxious stimuli provided by endotoxin which is known to further prime leukocytes and activate cyclo-oxygenase systems. Yet another possibility for the observed higher levels of H202 may be a reflection of increased production of H202 by different bacterial strains. In any case, since urine H202 levels in the ARDS-only group were about 70 percent of those in the ARDS-sepsis group, these findings suggest that the ARDS abnormality alone is the major producer of this oxygen metabolite in patients with both ARDS and sepsis. www.mycanadianpharmacy.com

Continue reading

Urine Hydrogen Peroxide During Adult Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Patients With and Without Sepsis – Discussion

However, within-group correlations were as follows: 0.969 for patients with ARDS only; 0.943 for survivors with ARDS and sepsis; and 0.961 for nonsurvivors with ARDS and sepsis. In general, there were not enough urine data at every lung injury score in each group to make meaningful statistical comparisons at each score. However, at a lung injury score of 3, the data showed significantly higher urine H202 concentrations in both ARDS-sepsis groups compared with the ARDS-only group. At lung score of 2, the urine H202 concentration of the survivor patients with ARDS and sepsis remained significantly increased compared with the patients with ARDS only. The difference, between the groups, in urine H202 level at these lung injury scores (3 and 2) are reflected in the significantly (p<0.05) poorer correlation (0.754) when correlating all data from the three groups.
The urine H202 concentrations in the healthy subjects and non-ARDS patient groups were not significantly different from each other or from the ARDS-sepsis and ARDS-only groups at the time when their lung injury scores were zero (Table 4). canadian neightbor pharmacy

Continue reading

Urine Hydrogen Peroxide During Adult Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Patients With and Without Sepsis – Results

Urine Hydrogen Peroxide During Adult Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Patients With and Without Sepsis - ResultsThe 23 patients with ARDS and sepsis were divided into two groups: 15 survivors and 8 nonsurvivors. Tables 1 through 3 give the clinical descriptions of the survivor ARDS-sepsis, nonsurvivor ARDS-sepsis, and ARDS-only groups, respectively.
Lung injury scores and urine H202 concentrations as a function of time in the ICU are shown in Figures 1 and 2, respectively, for the three groups of patients. During the first 48 h in the ICU, urine H202 in ARDS-only patients (295 ± 29 |xmol/L) was significantly lower (p < 0.05) than that in all patients with ARDS and sepsis (380 ± 13 jimol/L; n = 23), however, the lung injury scores of these two groups did not differ (data not reproduced in figures). In Figures 1 and 2, within the first 48 h (day 2), the urine H202 of the patients with ARDS and sepsis who did not survive (427 ± 19 jimol/L; n = 7) was significantly higher than in patients who survived sepsis (352 ± 14 |xmol/L; n = 15), again with no significant difference in lung injury score. canadian health&care mall

Continue reading

Urine Hydrogen Peroxide During Adult Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Patients With and Without Sepsis – Statistical Analysis

Septic shock was defined according to the criteria of Bone et al: (1) temperature > 38.3°C or < 35.6°C; (2) tachypnea (rate > 20) or ventilator rate > 10; (3) alveolar partial pressure of oxygen (Pa02)/ fraction of inspired oxygen (FIo2) < 280 (without other pulmonary or cardiovascular disease as the cause); (4) elevated lactate level (> 1.5 mmol/L); (5) oliguria, < 0.5 ml of urine per kilogram of body weight for at least 1 h; (6) blood cultures revealing Gram-positive or Gram-negative organisms; and (7) episode of hypotension (systolic pressure of < 90 mm Hg or a decrease from baseline of > 40 mm Hg) that was responsive to intravenous fluids or pharmacologic intervention. Patients who met five or more of the above criteria were included in the study.
The definition of ARDS was based on the following criteria: presence of diffuse infiltrates involving all four lung quadrants of the anteroposterior chest radiograph, severe hypoxemia (arterial partial pressure of oxygen [Pa02]/)FIo2 < 200 with positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP), and a pulmonary arterial wedge pressure of <18 mm Hg. Severity of parenchymal lung injury was quantified each day by the use of the lung injury score described by Murray et al. The score is based on a chest radiograph score, a PaOg/F^ score, a PEEP score (when ventilated), and evaluation of respiratory compliance. Patients who had a lung injury score greater than 2.5, which has been shown to represent severe ARDS, were included in the study.
Continue reading

Urine Hydrogen Peroxide During Adult Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Patients With and Without Sepsis – Methods

Urine Hydrogen Peroxide During Adult Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Patients With and Without Sepsis - MethodsHydrogen peroxide (H202), under normal conditions, is derived from phagocytic cells to act as an antimicrobial toxin and is produced as a by-product from oxidant enzymes that can be used, for example, as a cofactor for mono-oxygenase dehydrogenation and decarboxylation. In the case of adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), an excessive production of H202 has been detected in expired breath from these patients which is attributed to the abundance of activated phagocytes that have infiltrated their lungs. However, the specific role of excessive H202 production in ARDS lung abnormality is unknown. In the case of sepsis with ARDS, in vitro studies of patients blood have determined that scavenging of H202 is greater in ARDS patients with sepsis compared with sepsis alone. Furthermore, Nahum et al have demonstrated, in vitro, that patients with sepsis only have greater H202 production in mixed venous activated neutrophils compared with arterial neutrophils while the opposite is true for patients with ARDS only. sildenafil citrate pink

Continue reading

Respiratory Patterns After Cholecystectomy (14)

Observations made during this study help elucidate the natural history of respiratory changes after cholecystectomy. The alterations in abdominothoracic partitioning were maximal on the first postoperative day, returning toward baseline values on the third day. Other studies have all demonstrated a similar time profile for the effect of surgery on diaphragmatic function, with the earliest measurements showing the greatest degree of impairment. This contrasts with the time course for changes in Ve and gas exchange, which increase progressively to the third postoperative day. The strong positive correlations that exist between the postoperative changes in gas exchange and corresponding changes in Ve suggest that the rise in Ve may be simply the consequence of a normal respiratory response to increased metabolic rate. In addition, the lkck of any significant effect of surgery on Ve/Vco2 make it less likely that the increase in Ve occurred in order to compensate for postoperative compartmental dysfunction. birth control yasmin
Continue reading

Respiratory Patterns After Cholecystectomy (13)

Respiratory Patterns After Cholecystectomy (13)The effects of surgery seem to result from changes in the afferent components of reflex control. In dogs, stimulation of the gall bladder produces a profound depression of diaphragmatic activity. Reflex inhibition of diaphragmatic activity has also been demonstrated following stimulation of mesenteric nerves and the distention of esophagus and small intestine. Concomitant changes in the activity of abdominal musculature also affect diaphragmatic movement. The improvement in diaphragmatic function reported in postoperative patients treated with thoracic epidural anesthesia may result from interruption of the afferent limb of such reflexes. Administration of aminophyl-line also partially reverses the inhibitory effect of surgery on diaphragmatic movement, probably through its central nervous system effects. Incisional pain has long been considered to be an important factor, but the administration of epidural narcotics, while achieving complete relief of pain, has little effect on diaphragmatic function. buy birth control online
Continue reading

Respiratory Patterns After Cholecystectomy (12)

Others using fluoroscopy, ultrasonography, and magnetometry have reported a decrease in diaphragmatic motion following upper abdominal surgery. Indices of diaphragmatic function correlate well with the results of static lung function tests, while differences in the degree of diaphragmatic impairment correspond well to the observed differences in the rates of pulmonary complications between various types of operations. However, following surgery there is also decreased compliance of the abdominal compartment. Thus, the decreased Vj/Vt may be due to a combination of decreased diaphragmatic activity and decreased abdominal compliance. It is highly probable that this decrease in Val/VT results in poor ventilation of the lower lung fields, which is the cause of postoperative pulmonary problems. buy cheap antibiotics
Continue reading

Respiratory Patterns After Cholecystectomy (11)

Respiratory Patterns After Cholecystectomy (11)On the first day postoperatively, C02 stimulation failed to produce any increase in despite an already markedly elevated Vc. The magnitude of the increase in Vc was such that the increase in Vt was changed little by surgery. This response to C02-stimulated breathing is similar to that seen with voluntary hyperventilation. We have previously reported that following cholecystectomy, the increase in Vt during incentive spirometry exercises is due exclusively to an increase in Vc. It thus appears that on the day following upper abdominal surgery, increases in tidal volume of the magnitude observed in our two studies are due to increases in Vc and not V*. flovent inhaler
Continue reading

Respiratory Patterns After Cholecystectomy (10)

These findings lend some support to the custom of nursing postoperative patients in the semirecumbent position. If these patients had exhibited respiratory mechanics similar to those seen in the preoperative period, one could argue that the supine position optimizes diaphragmatic length tension relationships, that it reduces abdominal compliance, and that the supine position encourages maximal diaphragmatic excursion, leading to better ventilation of the lower lung fields and reduction of pulmonary complications. The apparent absence of such effects on abdominal movement postoperatively negates the theoretical advantages of the supine position. The semirecumbent position is generally preferred for the postoperative patient, because there is less likelihood of aspiration and the FRC is higher. The beneficial effects of a change in posture from supine to sitting in patients recovering from abdominal surgery are evidenced by improvements in gas exchange. antibiotic levaquin
Continue reading

Pages: Prev 1 2 3 4 Next