A Comparative Study of the Psychosocial Assets of Adults with Cystic Fibrosis and Their Healthy Peers: Discussion (Part 2)

A Comparative Study of the Psychosocial Assets of Adults with Cystic Fibrosis and Their Healthy Peers: Discussion (Part 2)Strauss and Wellisch believed this tendency among individual CF patients to rate their health as better than that of other patients was evidence of “minimization,” and they described this as a useful coping strategy for dealing with illness. However, patients are not alone in practicing minimization: 89 percent of the adults with CF who have a significant other participating in our prospective study are described by these significant others as healthier than other adults with CF.
The importance of these similarities is that they highlight the differences in the conclusions suggested by the data when information from a healthy comparison group is also available. For instance, Strauss and Wellisch concluded that a high rate of “employment and extra time at work may serve to compensate in part for lowered self-esteem and an impoverished social life” among adults with CF. However, there is no evidence that the adults with CF in our study were working at an inordinately high rate; indeed, they were less likely to be employed than were members of the comparison group. Also, there is no evidence that the patients with CF in this study suffered from lowered self-esteem: no significant differences between the CF and the healthy group emerged in response to any of the questions exploring perceived societal contributions and perceived use of talents; and there is no evidence that the CF adults in the present study had impoverished social lives: there were no significant differences between the CF and the comparison group on the social network density index or on any of its six component questions, including the questions asking about numbers of close friends and frequency of feeling lonely. buy antibiotics online
Similarly, on the basis of uncontrolled psychiatric interviews, Boyle et al deemed the marriages of all the married patients in their sample to be marred by instability, unhappiness, or sexual dissatisfaction. However, the married CF adults in our study were as sexually satisfied as their married healthy peers and there was no significant difference between the two married groups in their expressed satisfaction with the recent course of their lives (p = .37; the mean for both groups indicating a general satisfaction in this regard).

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